Undergraduate Courses on Migration

FALL QUARTER


ECN 190 (Topics in Economics)
Santiago Perez, Assistant Professor, Economics

The course will explore the economics of international migrations. Specific topics include the study of how immigrants are selected from the population of the countries of origin, how immigrants assimilate into their countries of destination, how immigration influence the economy of the destination country, how immigration influences those left behind and how migration policy is conducted around the world.


FYS 002 - 043: Migration and Citizenship in the Contemporary Era
Jeannette Money, Associate Professor, Political Science


SPA 174: Chicanx Culture: Mexican Migrations to the US: Bandidos, Braceros and Bad Hombres
Robert McKee Irwin, Professor, Spanish and Portuguese

This course presents a historical journey through the many waves of Mexican migration to "el norte," with a focus on both the perspectives and experiences of migrants as well as their public image in the United States. Course materials include a variety of cultural works, emphasizing several well known figures such as Joaquín Murrieta, la Santa de Cabora, Juan Soldado, los Deportados de los Gatos, Chalino Sánchez, Elvira Arellano and Héctor Barajas, among others. (This course is given in Spanish)


WINTER QUARTER
 

ASA 155: American Legal History/Asian Americans and the Law
Robyn Magalit Rodriguez, Associate Professor, Asian American Studies

The law critically shapes Asian American community formation, everyday life and future possibilities. How Asian Americans earn a livelihood, where they can live, who they can love and even how they identify has been determined by legislation and administrative policies including those governing immigration and citizenship, employment and land ownership, residency and segregation, miscegenation (i.e., inter-racial marriage), and more. At the same time, Asian Americans have played a crucial role in shaping the law both individually and collectively. How U.S. law and Asian Americans mutually constitute each other will be examined in this course. We will read actual texts of laws, excerpts of legislative debates and judicial opinions as well as law review articles, academic texts and other readings on topics mentioned above as well as colonialism and self-determination, discrimination, internment and reparations, affirmative action and others. 
Course Syllabus

 

ECN 190 (Topics in Economics)
Santiago Perez, Assistant Professor, Economics


The course will explore the economics of international migrations. Specific topics include the study of how immigrants are selected from the population of the countries of origin, how immigrants assimilate into their countries of destination, how immigration influence the economy of the destination country, how immigration influences those left behind and how migration policy is conducted around the world.


HIS 102X: Undergraduate Proseminar in History: Bans and Border Walls
Stacy D Fahrenthold, Assistant Professor, History

 

SOC 4: Immigration and Opportunity
Caitlin Patler, Assistant Professor, Sociology

This course explores immigration through a sociological lens. We will stress the historical and social contexts of immigration, the relations between immigrants, existing ethnic groups, and U.S. laws and institutions, and the changing processes of incorporation and ethnic formation. This class includes a focus on current events and topics, including understanding the policies that have led to undocumented immigration and the rise in mass detention and deportation, recent issues relating to refugee communities, and discussions of ongoing policy debates about immigrant admissions and immigrants' rights at the federal, state, and local level.
 


SPRING QUARTER


ASA2: Asian American Contemporary Experience
Robyn Magalit Rodriguez, Associate Professor, Asian American Studies

Studies through the critical analysis of the impact of race, racism, ethnicity, imperialism, militarism, and immigration since post-World War II on Asian Americans. Topics may include sexuality, criminality, class, hate crimes, and inter-ethnic relations. Course Prerequisites: course 001.
Course Syllabus


ASA 150: Filipino American Experience
Robyn Magalit Rodriguez, Associate Professor, Asian American Studies


Examination of the relationship between the Filipino-American community, the Philippine home community and the larger American society through a critical evaluation of the historical and contemporary conditions, problems and prospects of Filipinos in the U.S.
Course Syllabus


HIS 110: Themes in World History: Global Migration History
Stacy D Fahrenthold, Assistant Professor, History
 

IRE 104: The Political Economy of International Migration 
David Kyle, Associate Professor, Sociology


SOC 104: The Political Economy of International Migration 
David Kyle, Associate Professor, Sociology



SOC 103: Evaluation Research Methods
Caitlin Patler, Assistant Professor, Sociology

Evaluation research is research undertaken for the purpose of determining the impact of a social intervention, such as a program or policy aimed at solving a problem or addressing an issue. The goal of this course is to teach students how to use sociological research methods to do evaluation research. These methodological skills are desired requisites for many diverse careers. In this class, we will learn and apply sociological research methods to pressing social problems. In other words, we will learn how to “do” research and then we will actually do it. We will start by learning the basics of research ethics, then learn multiple research methods that can be applied in program or policy evaluation. 

After learning the basics, students will have the opportunity to engage in a hands-on evaluation research project with Professor Patler, as follows: Our class research project is based on Professor Patler’s researchDeferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA).